CoronaVirus

Here you can find useful coronavirus tips & stats of the current coronaVirus status in our world…

World-Wide CoronaVirus case, simply check this data before buying a new product

Coronavirus tips

Keep track of the coronavirus covid-19 pandemic

Globally, the number of coronavirus cases as wells deaths, is going up. Plenty of world and local leaders

coronavirus tips
coronavirus tips

warn that, while some growth rates may seem like they’re slowing in pockets, a second or third wave of infections could be even worse.

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Even as some countries and states reopen nonessential businesses and public spaces, it’s important to remember first and foremost that the coronavirus thread hasn’t disappeared. Just because restrictions are lifted, doesn’t mean you won’t acquire COVID-19 or pass it on to someone else. so keep coming back to this page, to see the most up to date coronavirus tips and stats.

Fingers no-more: Use your knees, feet, elbows and knuckles instead

If you’re still pressing buttons for walk signs with your fingertips, stop. Any time you have to open a door, push a button, pull a lever or digitally sign for something, use a different body part instead. You have plenty.

For example, I’ll often tap out a PIN code or make a selection on a digital screen with my knuckle instead of the pad of my finger. I’ll push open a door with my shoulder, hip or foot instead of my hands.

You can usually flip on a light switch or sink faucet with your elbow or wrist, and you can wrap the sleeve of your sweater or jacket around the handle of any doors you have to physically pull open. It’s easy enough to toss your clothing into the wash later rather than expose your skin now, especially if the chances you’ll use your hands to touch food items or your face is high.

Carry extra napkins, disinfecting wipes and facial tissue

Packing extra tissues, disinfecting wipes, wet wipes and other paper products in my purse is already part of my habit, but now I pay extra attention to how much paper I have on hand.

Normally, I might use a spare tisue to wipe my hands after an impromptu snack (also in my bag). Today, these products could come in handy to clear away germs, or act as a barrier between you (or your phone) and a surface. For example, opening a door handle if you just saw someone cough into their hands before turning a knob.

For food & package delivery, embrace the awkward

Keeping your distance means that you’ll need to get comfortable speaking through closed doors and hanging back rather than rushing forward to help the person delivering you packages, mail and food. For instance, if you happen to be outside, it’s ok to let the mail carrier walk all the way up to the front door and place the mail in the box rather than take it directly it helps protect you and them by keeping your distance.

Equally, if a food delivery person or neighbor drops something off, give a warm thank you through the closed door and wait for them to recede six feet before opening to door to thank them again and wave. They’ll appreciate your consideration and seriousness.

Stop handling cash

While it’s believed that the highest risk of acquiring coronavirus comes from person-to-person transmission, we do know that shared surfaces can harbor the virus. Play it safe by setting the cash aside for now and relying more on contactless payments.

A large number of payment terminals accept Google PayApple Pay, Samsung Pay and credit cards with the contactless logo on them. And remember, if a digital signature is required, you can use your knuckle instead of your index finger. For a physical signature, start packing your own pen.

Distance, distance, distance

Social distancing can mean anything from hunkering down at home and refraining from seeing outside friends and family in person to keeping a boundary between you and others when you do go out. The practice of keeping six feet away from those outside your home group extends to waiting in line at the grocery store, going on walks (you can momentarily walk in the bike lane if you’re careful about looking out for street traffic) and picking up food to go.

If you need to keep more distance between you and someone else while on a walk or when reaching for an item at the store, take a step back and wait or politely ask the person to give you more clearance. (“Oh, I’m trying to keep my distance from everyone.”)

Set aside your reusable bags

Increasingly, store policy excludes you from bringing outside tote bags and other bags into grocery stores. If you want to lessen your environmental impact, find ways to reuse the store’s fresh bags at home.

The stores I shop at continue to make baskets and carts available, and only some offer sanitary wipes. Others have assigned gloved staff to wipe down carts and baskets for you with disinfectant, before you shop. Others still are spraying your hands with disinfectant before you enter a shop.

Regardless, it’s a good idea to thoroughly wash your hands with hand soap before you leave home to protect others, bring your own sanitary wipes if you have them and the store doesn’t offer that option and be sure to wash your hands when you get home. Really, we can’t stress that enough.

Watch where you put your smart-phone

While we’ve gotten the go ahead to use disinfecting wipes on phones, another smart idea is to avoid placing your device on iffy surfaces to begin with. Do you really need to put your phone down, or can you just stash it in a coat pocket or purse? The less you can expose your phone to shared surfaces, the less you need to worry about them in the first place.

If you do put your phone down on a shared surface, say if you’re paying for takeout, lay down a napkin and set your phone on that. It’ll save you having to disinfect your device quite so often.

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